12 Inspirational Quotes by K. Pattabhi Jois.

public.jpeg

K. Pattabhi Jois is globally known for being the incredible yoga Guru that he was. While he spread the practice of Ashtanga yoga, he also inspired many with his teachings and profound words of wisdom. 


Here are 12 quotes by K. Pattabhi Jois:


1. ‘Do your practice and all is coming’.


2. ‘Anyone can practice. Young man can practice. Old man can practice. Very old man can practice. Man who is sick, he can practice. Man who doesn't have strength can practice. Except lazy people; lazy people can't practice Ashtanga yoga.’


3. ‘It is very important to understand yoga philosophy: without philosophy, practice is not good, and yoga practice is the starting place for yoga philosophy. Mixing both is actually the best.’


4. ‘Yoga is 99% practice and 1% theory.’


5. ‘Yoga is your mind control capacity.’


6. ‘Body is not stiff, mind is stiff.’


7. ‘Yoga is for internal cleansing, not external exercising. Yoga means true self-knowledge.’


8. ‘Yoga is universal…. But don’t approach yoga with a business mind looking for worldly gain.’


9. ‘When the breath control is correct, mind control is possible.’


10. ‘Yoga is an internal practice. The rest of just a circus.’


11. ‘So whether you do your first downward dog at 14 or 44, it’s not your history but your presence on your mat that counts.’


12. ‘The full ashtanga system practiced with devotion leads to freedom within one's heart.’



Sourced from A-Z Quotes and Wordpress

‘If I’m not present, what’s the point?’

Adriana Lee is a yoga teacher and reiki healer.

Adriana Lee is a yoga teacher and reiki healer.

1. What style of yoga do you teach? And, where are you located?

I teach Forrest Yoga, Budokon Yoga, Restorative Yoga, and Yin!


2. What is your intention behind teaching?

My intention is to help my students connect their minds, bodies, and spirits. As well as to teach my students how to heal themselves, and to spread joy through the practice of yoga. 


3. Who are your mentors in yoga? 

Heba Saab is my main mentor but I’ve also studied under Cameron Shayne, and Vidya Jaqueline Heisel. 


4. What have they taught you? 

Heba taught me all about Forrest yoga, helped me further my understanding of anatomy & biomechanics, and how to teach. Cameron Shayne taught me about animal locomotives, philosophy, and about patience& strength. Vidya was my first 200 hour teacher and she taught me all of the basics, the traditions, and a lot about ahimsa. 


5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you? 

Fierce Medicine is my number one recommendation, always. 


6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice? 

I am learning and re-learning that the practice is individual and it is an internal practice. The moment we focus too much on the external or get lost in comparison we lose the point. 


7. How often do you practice? 

My practice looks different every day. Right now, it consists of daily meditation and asana practice about 4-7 days a week. 


8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana? 

Ahimsa comes first and foremost. I am always checking to make sure that my actions are kind to all sentient beings and to the planet. I practice all of the Yamas and Niyamas - not perfectly,of course, but I do try. I also meditate (Dharamshi) regularly. 


9. Why is being present so important to you

I know what it’s like to get swept up in the future and the past; however neither of those places exist right now. When we’re not in the moment we miss out on that moment. If I’m not present, what’s the point? I’ve found that being in nature or with animals is extremely grounding. My dog is my guru (LOL). But seriously, he gets my undivided attention and it’s teaching me to be more present with people too.


10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name?

I’m easy to find! On Instagram, Facebook, and on my website it’s all under Yoga with Adriana. @yogawithadriana 

‘There is a very common misconception that yoga is only for the white, elite population. Or, yoga is only for the “bendy,” or “flexible.”

Alba Avella is a yoga teacher located in Denver.

Alba Avella is a yoga teacher located in Denver.

1.What style of yoga do you teach? And, where are you located? I teach a style of vinyasa and power yoga, and I am located in Denver, CO. 


2. What is your intention behind teaching?

My intention for teaching has evolved over the years. At first, I just wanted to help people move their bodies in a new and unique way. As I have gotten older and more experienced in this yoga community, I realize there is a very common misconception that yoga is only for the white, elite population. Or, yoga is only for the “bendy,” or “flexible.” These are myths that I want to debunk when it comes to yoga. Yoga is accessible to anyone, anywhere, for any body. Beyond the physical practice, my goal is to teach my students how to live their yoga off the mat. Yoga is not about backbends, name brand leggings, and “perfect” bodies. Yoga is a lifestyle of kindness, compassion, and wellness. My biggest goal is to bring yoga into lower income communities, schools, and non-profits to show that yoga can help and heal all humans no matter where you are in the race. 

3. Who are your mentors in yoga?  My main mentor is my own teacher Dawnelle Arthur. She taught me how to teach yoga in my own right way. I have tons of inspiration from other movers such as Martha Graham, the inventor of contemporary modern dance. I look to people like martial arts expert Bruce Lee, movers like Ronda Rousey and Simone Biles. Yogis like Alexandra Crow, and Kyle Weiger. Mentors that are or have been disruptive, and make or have made waves for the status quo. 

4. What have they taught you? My mentors have always taught me to never believe anything unless it resonates within your own body and soul. They have taught me to never get caught in one box, or one description. I am a mover in every sense of the word, and my mentors have taught me to never settle for the norm. 


5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you? 

Women Who Run With The Wolves.


6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice? 

I listen to what my body needs on a daily. Somedays I am called to my heart, other days to my hips. Some days, I want a strong vigorous practice and other times, I journal and cry on my mat. My asana practice teaches me to listen to my body and my mind.


7. How often do you practice? 

I get to my mat 3-5 times a week, and exercise in other ways the rest of the week. It’s all about balance. 


8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana? 

I think the true yoga practice happens off the mat. The physical asana is just the tip of the iceberg that is yoga. When I am triggered, and I react in a calm way, that is me taking yoga off the mat. When I can be calm in a stressful situation, that is my yoga. When I can see things from a different lens, that is my ahimsa. 

 Compassion, Empathy, Non- Judgement, those are the three main things I take with me off my mat. We all have our story, and when we practice self care, and love for us and others, then we are practicing yoga in its truest form. 


9. Why is being present so important to you? Being present is so important to me because it is truly a meditation when we are in the present moment. Chatter runs through our heads minute-after-minute on the daily. We are constantly bombarded with information, distractions, etc. We are fed how to look, eat, dress, act all the time. 

When we are present, truly and fully there, that is a beautiful thing. And I strive to find that beauty whenever I can. 


10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name?

Facebook: Alba Avella Yoga 

Instagram: @movement_by_alba 

Website: alba-yoga.com 

‘How can you fully enjoy a sunrise on a mountain peak if you are already thinking about the next higher mountain?‘

Marcel Clementi is a yoga teacher based in Austria.

Marcel Clementi is a yoga teacher based in Austria.

1. What style of yoga do you teach?

 I teach Ashtanga, Vinyasa, Hatha, Power Yoga and Yin.


2. What is your intention behind teaching?

I want to inspire my students to live a healthier and happier life and to learn useful things not only for the mat but also for their daily life. Yoga is more than just doing the asanas. It’s a way of living.


3. Who are your mentors in yoga? 

Victor Hernandez is the teacher of both of my teacher trainings and a very inspiring, young teacher. Online I like to get new inspirations from Patrick Beach.

4. What have they taught you? 
They taught me that every body and everybody is different – and that’s beautiful. And that the journey of being a good yoga teacher never ends. Continuous studying, growing, practicing and reading is necessary for being an inspiring teacher and person.

5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you? 

There are many! But perfectly imperfect by Baron Baptiste and The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle are definitely my favorites so far.


6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice? 

Currently I am focusing more on the awareness and the body-mind-connection and to deepen my meditation during the asanas. I am practicing more gentle flows and I prefer to hold the asanas a little bit longer. When I started with yoga I saw it more as my daily workout routine. Now it’s my daily meditation routine. My lesson is that the real change is happening inside.

7. How often do you practice? 

 If possible every day.

8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana? 
I am always trying to keep a positive mindset, to be honest and to support others. I take care of myself with my morning routine including meditation, reading and a workout.

But the most important thing for me is, to take my yoga and meditation practice into my daily life. To enjoy a beautiful day in nature, to really listen during a conversation and to be fully present as often as possible. Yoga helps me to live my life more fully.

 

9. Why is being present so important to you? 

Because if you just plan your future or think about your past, you never really live.

How can you fully enjoy a sunrise on a mountain peak if you are already thinking about the next higher mountain? Or, you compare the moment with the last sunset you saw?

Live for each moment, be happy and grateful and life will offer you more than you can imagine.

10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name?

 

My Instagram is @marcelclementiyoga

Blog www.marcel-clementi.com

YouTube Marcel Clementi

FB Marcel Clementi

‘Yoga is basically in everything.’

Natascha Henderson is a Yoga teacher based in Germany.

Natascha Henderson is a Yoga teacher based in Germany.

1. What style of yoga do you teach? I did my teacher training in Satyananda Yoga but have been influenced by many styles of yoga over the years and more or less created my own nuance based on classical hatha yoga.

2. What is your intention behind teaching? Yoga has given me so much - psychologically, physically, emotionally. Being so filled by this gives me an inner drive to share it. 

3. Who are your mentors in yoga? Heinz Grill has had a big impact on me - more the pictures of his asanas which expressed the way I feel in yoga. Patanjali, of course, mainly yoga itself- the practice itself is the greatest guru for me.

4. What have they taught you? Patience, precision, surrender and love.

5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you? The Yoga Sutras

6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice? I´m leaning/relearning to trust in life.

7. How often do you practice? Everyday.

8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana? Yoga is basically in everything. I think if you´ve practiced most of your life, you find it becomes interwoven in your life.

9. Why is being present so important to you?  Because it is the difference between existing and living.

10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name? my IG name is @natascha_yoga.

‘I think the biggest lesson I have received is to believe in myself.’

Natalie Jones is a Yoga teacher based in New York City.

Natalie Jones is a Yoga teacher based in New York City.

1. What style(s) of yoga do you teach?

I teach Baptiste Power & Bikram yoga as well as Inferno Hot Pilates. Recently I co-created and have been teaching a style that combines yoga & Pilates, and it is so much fun! 


2. What is your intention behind teaching?

My intention behind teaching is to empower people to live their most awesome lives. If I can help them to feel amazing and learn to have fun and laugh along the way, I feel I have done my job. Ever since I was a little girl, I have loved making people laugh and one of my biggest joys as an adult is showing people that wellness can be fun. I love to help people heal, and I love connecting with people on a deeper level. It is a privilege and their is such magic in these connections.


3. Who are your mentors in yoga? 

I have had some amazing mentors along the way that have opened me up to so much possibility. Marla Thomas, owner of Queen City Yoga in Burlington, VT. Louise Giordani, founder of Everywear Activewear, and Gabi Walters, creator of Inferno Hot Pilates. I have been so blessed to have such inspiring people in my life that have pushed me to be my best self!


4. What have they taught you? 

I think the biggest lesson I have received is to believe in myself. If I want something or to get somewhere, it is up to me and it is going to be hard work. It's also going to be totes worth it. 


5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you? 

How Yoga Works by Michael Roach. It is such a beautiful story about the power and magic of yoga, and how it lives and breathes in all spaces and places in our life. 


6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice? 

To flow. I've been thinking a lot about how to tap into the natural rhythm and flow that exists on and off my mat. When we are in a true state of flow nothing else matters and we are fully present. 


7. How often do you practice? 

I practice 5-6 times a week, which may or may not include a self-practice. My philosophy is that in order to stay true to and inspired in one's craft they must practice it. I teach four different modalities, so that keeps me busy.  


8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana? 

I journal and am always in self-inquiry, I eat and consume mindfully (yes, I am a self-proclaimed cheeseburger connoisseur, but I only eat pasture-raised and local), I am a volunteer mentor for Africa Yoga Project, and my coaching business naturally incorporates yoga philosophy. 


9. Why is being present so important to you

I recently heard that when we think of the past, we most likely experience sadness and when we look to the future, we experience anxiety. In the present moment is where we can access happiness and contentment. I like being happy :)


10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name?

My name on FB is Natalie Jane Jones, my IG is @thenatalizer and my business is @makeme.awesome 



‘Curiosity and questioning are key — I will always practice in this fashion.’

Shakti Bird is a yoga teacher that is international.

Shakti Bird is a yoga teacher that is international.

1. What style of yoga do you teach?

My teaching style has evolved tremendously over the last few years.  Currently, my classes are unlike any particular format that I’ve experienced.  My passion is functional movement/moving for longevity, so I have had to incorporate aspects from a variety of different avenues.  If I had to classify my teaching style, I would say that it is a happy marriage between traditional Hatha Yoga and modern functional movement.


2. What is your intention behind teaching?
My intention is to help others move with intention.  There are so many choices to make in a yoga class, but very few practitioners understand how to work with their intention. My goal is to help students clarify their intention and work towards their goal in the most intelligent and efficient way.  For example, many people in the yoga community would consider “knees, chest, chin” (or prostration pose) a modification for chaturanga; however, if someone has the intention of working on backbending, prostration pose is a far more intelligent (and therefore, advanced) selection for their vinyasas.


3. Who are your mentors in yoga?

My yoga teacher from Naropa University, Nataraja Kallio, will forever impact my teaching and the way that I continuously strive to improve my state of being — he is a real-life example of the goal of yoga.


My partner, Daniel Rama.  Anyone who has had the pleasure of learning from him, has, without a doubt, been elevated in some way from that experience.  Very few words could actually do him justice.  


4. What have they taught you? 

Nataraja — humility and compassion — he leads by the utmost example.

Rama — contentment and unconditional love — again, leading by example.


5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you?

The 4 Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz gave me freedom I hadn’t known before reading it. 

6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice?

I refer to proper practice as “right effort” — knowing my intention and pursuing it in the most efficient way.  I have always found that if I am doing something wrong, then I simply don’t have the proper information regarding that subject.  I truly believe that if someone is doing something repeatedly for an extended period of time and not seeing improvement, then they are doing something (or things) incorrectly — it is likely that they do not have the proper information and therefore, are not practicing with the “right effort”.  My asana practice is currently showing me that all of the information I spent years gathering, questioning, and applying, has truly paid off. Curiosity and questioning are key — I will always practice in this fashion.


7. How often do you practice? 

I have gone through long phases during my non-stop travels where my physical practice has been somewhat nonexistent, however, the real yoga is practiced every single day, all day. Currently, my physical practice is daily.


8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana? 

A true Yogi must embody the first 7 limbs if they are to reach Samadhi, the eighth limb — the goal.  I draw a lot of inspiration from Lord Rama — the depiction of righteousness. By always doing the right thing (being a good human) and taking care of what needs to be done, I find that I am constantly (even if, unconsciously) working the first 7 limbs.  The practices of Meditation and Pranayama have a very profound impact on my existence.


9. Why is being present so important to you?

Joy is found only in the present moment.  If we could all be truly present, we would experience uninterrupted joy through the incredible phenomena of this endlessly beautiful life.


10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name?

Follow me on instagram!  @shaktibird_

‘My greatest Mentor has always been Life.’

Daniel Rama is a travelling Yoga Teacher.

Daniel Rama is a travelling Yoga Teacher.

1. What style of yoga do you teach?

I have been formally trained in an ashram of traditional Hatha Yoga. However, currently I believe it is important for individuals to assess their strength and weaknesses, consider their personal goals, and include those techniques which will help them succeed. If you think about it, the masters of any lineage did not necessarily conform to any specific style. The masters created their own style based upon personal experience. 


2. What is your intention behind teaching?

My intention has always been to move from compulsive reaction to conscious response. I truly believe that we are responsible for every aspect of our life. Everything we are, and everything we are not is our own doing. If we are able to respond consciously to the situations of life, we will find that every single experience is beautiful beyond belief. My intention is to use certain techniques to help others understand this fact as truth.


3. Who are your mentors in yoga? 

There are a few physical figures who have helped accelerate my personal understanding, but my greatest mentor has always been Life itself - or rather, a powerful curiosity for all things within this Life. 

4. What have they taught you? 

Consider the greatest spiritual texts - the Gita, the bible, the koran, etc. All of these great scriptures use analogy and story to shed light on the mysteries of Creation. However, if you express complete curiosity towards all things - big or small - you will begin to gain first hand understanding of the essence of the Scriptures.

5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you? 

I have never been much of a reader. Books are second hand information at best - someone else interpretation of their own experience. Because they are second hand, books have always been a little confusing for me. I prefer to focus on first-hand experience.


6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice? 

My practice began with need for physical rehabilitation. I suffered an injury that doctors told me I would never recover from. But I have always been stubborn, and told myself that these physicians are idiots - they don’t see the complete picture. Within 12 months, through basic meditation, visualization and positive thinking I managed to make a full recovery. Once I had healed the body, I decided to see how far I could push it. Present day, I find almost no challenge within the realm of asana. The more my physical practice develops and evolves, the more I begin to realize how empty such activities are. Of course, maintaining health of the physical body is very important, and my daily practice certainly achieves that end, but in the grand scheme, I recognize that there are far more important dimensions of existence for me to explore. 


7. How often do you practice

24 hours a day, 7 days per week.


8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana? 

Patanjali’s eight limbs are a system of simple guidelines. They are certainly helpful for many individuals, but at the same time, they the natural byproduct of experiencing life as it truly is. Yoga tells us that we are all One - a statement many will utter, but few will actually experience as truth. If you truly realize that we are one and the same, would you need to talk about Yamas and Niyamas? If you see Life the way it truly is, you would recognize and act upon the importance of proper exercise and proper breathing. 


Do you think Patanjali followed this system of ashtanga yoga? Of course not. Patanjali was able to experience the end goal, and reverse engineered the process so that others might experience that same outcome. If you walk into every situation with complete curiosity, you will be a natural master of all 8 limbs.


9. Why is being present so important to you

Being present is not important. If you are serious about Life, it is the only real option.


10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name?

Follow me @danielrama_ on instagram and visit www.danielrama.com for information on upcoming workshops, retreats and yoga teacher trainings. 





‘I don't need to protect myself from what I think my limitations are.’

Mary Emfinger is a Yoga Teacher based in Texas.

Mary Emfinger is a Yoga Teacher based in Texas.

1. What style of yoga do you teach?

I teach a smattering of styles. My first love was Yin Yoga and that has allowed to branch out into also teaching classes like Gentle Yoga, Slow Flow, Hot Power Fusion, and Restorative (yep, it's different than Yin).  


2. What is your intention behind teaching?

Keep learning from every-yogi. I want to go into each class with an open mind and the ability to change the sequence I have developed specifically for the yogis that showed up to practice that day. Bodies, in all of their strength and in all of their limitation, should be honored and respected. Therefore, my class should be for the people who show up as opposed to whatever it was that I thought I should teach at that day and time.  


3. Who are your mentors in yoga? 

Rebekah Rivera, every teacher of every yoga class I've ever taken and each yogi I have ever had the honor of teaching. 


4. What have they taught you? 

How do I even begin? Firstly, to be myself. When I am teaching, do not change who I am - and I'm committed to holding fast to that. Although I look up to many yoga teachers, it does not benefit any of us for me to strive to become them. People who gravitate to the classes I teach will be different than the people who gravitate to my teachers, and that is a wonderful thought. 


They have all taught me the importance of language, how to teach to each different yogi, how to honor the strength in every human body. How to laugh during class. How to play.


5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you? 

Inner Engineering: A Yogi's Guide to Joy by Sadhguru gave me practical ways and often funny anecdotes to practice yoga in the everyday moments. 


6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice? 

I don't need to protect myself from what I think my limitations are.  


7. How often do you practice? 

I practice a few times a week. I have a very physical lifestyle, I also run, swim, bike and weight train on a regular basis to keep my fitness levels high enough for distance marathon and triathlon races, so asana practice is often my "guilty pleasure" - my coach only approves one yoga class every week or so, so please don't tell her!


8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana? 

Yama - Integrity is one of my core values. I feel strongly about doing what I say I am going to do. I keep a vegetarian diet, I believe in positive self-affirmation (something I've been practicing during running),  I believe in Asteya not only of belongings but also of thoughts, time, etc. 

Niyama - Self-discipline comes out of me in the ongoing journey of contentment. I honor how I feel, trying to never judging any emotion according to how society has classified it (ie happy, angry, sad, etc) as either good or bad. 


Pranayama - I love practicing and teaching these before or after asana. Square breathing and alternate nostril breathing are the ones I gravitate to most often.


Pratyahara - Do you ever stop for a few minutes and send your thoughts inside your own body? You can feel things moving around - maybe it's energy, or blood, or food digesting... it's pretty rad. Sometimes just placing my hands on myself helps me with this.

Dharana - This one is hard for me. Usually chanting is the best way for me to keep concentration on one thing and let go of my mind chatter. Still working on it to be honest.

Dhyana - I believe a person can meditate anywhere, anyway, any place they want to. It's different for everyone - I'm not usually the sit and meditate in silence kind of gal, although I can get there after an asana practice. If you meditate walking, running, sewing, riding a horse, playing dodgeball I'd have probably sit at that lunch table in high school.


Samadhi - This is a destination and the journey is my life.  


9. Why is being present so important to you? 

If I can stay in the moment, I can avoid feelings of disappointment or depression. Staying in my body and in the moment allows me to spend more time in contentment.  


10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name?

Please follow me on instagram @marekinss and join my mailing list at maryemfinger.com


‘You can have the most amazing standing bow and eat all the kale, but if you're not kind to others, you're missing something.’

Ksenia Voropaeva is a yoga teacher based in New York City. She is also the Founder of Anaday-   available in our retail section

Ksenia Voropaeva is a yoga teacher based in New York City. She is also the Founder of Anaday- available in our retail section

1. What style of yoga do you teach? 


I teach a mix of lineages that have been taught to me, and that resonate in my personal practice. I believe in teaching what I know. So I combine Vinyasa, Ashtanga, Bikram, Dharma, Kundalini, Mantra, plus incorporate new things that I'm learning and working on myself. I'm forever a student and that keeps me curious and growing. Being a teacher means being a student first.

2. What is your intention behind teaching?

To pass on the teachings and help people feel better.


3. Who are your mentors in yoga? 

So many amazing teachers through the years in NYC! Jared McCann has pushed (and still pushes) my practice to the next level. Erin Rose gives a depth that's like no other. I now notice my kidneys when I practice. Gauri has shifted my life in so many ways through mantra work. My partner, Mario,teaches my everyday how to take the yoga home (om shanti). And I’m always learning so, so much from my yoga community—the amazing humans who I feel like I've known through lifetimes at this point. There's is something so special about deep asana and mediation work with people. You get to know them on another level. It’s like osmosis. These are my mentors.


4. What have they taught you? 

Be present, do the practice every. single. day. (doesn't have to be asana, doesn't have to be on a mat, but it needs to be something), be kind, be of service, love.


5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you? 

The Science of Breath.


6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice? 

Big shifts happen in subtle ways.


7. How often do you practice? 

Everyday.


8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana? 

Through everyday actions. The more I practice and connect with my inner-self, the more I recognize how everything is an extension of my experience—home, health, relationships, career, finances, dreams. Everything is connected. So for me, it's a matter of recognizing my patterns and shifting them. The Yamas and Niyamas are foundation #1. You can have the most amazing standing bow and eat all the kale, but if you're not kind to others, you're missing something. And that something is reflection of our own fears (aka absence of love). Once we start to really confront ourselves and our patterns (of harming, dishonesty, excess, attachment, non-contentment, fill in your Yama/Niyama blank____), we begin to remove the blocks to energy/love/divinity, and the rest of the limbs fall into place. It’s a constant remembering that my home, family, career, everything else in life, has to come from this place of awareness.


9. Why is being present so important to you

They say time is an illusion and the present is all there is. That's tough to wrap my head around. What I do know, is that it's only when I'm fully present that I feel a deep sense of connection. When I'm not worried about the future or analyzing the past, and am just doing my asana, my meditation, or creating, my energy flows. Rather than trying or forcing, I become a channel. Stay receptive, as Dharma says. That's only possible in the present. 


10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name?

Find me @heyananday!


‘Everything eventually works out as its meant to, the lessons are in how you handle yourself between the gaps.’

Debbie Lash is a yoga teacher and health coach based in Los Angeles, California.

Debbie Lash is a yoga teacher and health coach based in Los Angeles, California.

1. What style of yoga do you teach?

With my clients I teach a collaboration of Vinyasa Flow and Restoration depending on what is needed on the day. My public offerings are various levels of Vinyasa Flow, with some classes in a heated environment. I’m passionate about music so my playlists are super important to setting the tone plus I weave in essential oils for a sensory experience


2. What is your intention behind teaching?

I have many intentions behind my teaching, and they change daily.  But what's important to me is guiding people to connect to their breath by consciously breathing into the whole body, and then once the breath is established, and becomes the voice of their practice, then they're able to cultivate windows of stillness in the mind.


3. Who are your mentors in yoga? 

I did my 500 YogaWorks TT with Carolina Goldberg, this woman changed my life.  Other teachers who inspire me are Joe Kara, Andrea Marcum, David Lynch, Danielle Karuna (to name a few)!  Living in LA is a blessing as I am surrounded by many of the most inspiring yoga teachers in the world - it’s a life long journey with so much to learn.


4. What have they taught you? 

The best advice I was ever given was “just get out there and teach and the rest will fall into place”.  

Other great advice:

 - teach what you practice (meaning don’t teach poses that you are not practicing yourself). 

- be authentic.

- keep showing up & doing the work.

- practice where you want to teach, get to know your community.



5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you? 

Close to OM - Stretching your yoga from your mat to your life   By Andrea Marcum 

Autobiography of a Yogi - Paramahansa Yogananda

Wherever you go there you are By Jon Kabat-Zinn


6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice? 

Patience is everything.
Everything eventually works out as its meant to, the lessons are in how you handle yourself between the gaps.Keep showing up, doing the work and the body, mind and soul will unfold and transform.How you do your yoga on the mat is how you live your life off the mat.


7. How often do you practice? 

In an ideal world I practice daily but then sometimes lifes gets in the way and thats ok. 


8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana? 

Dharana and Dhyana go together like salt and pepper - Daily meditation - even if its 10 mins or Savasana (it all counts).

Pranayama - I teach this with every client and at the start of every single class - the breath is everything.

Pratyahara mainly comes in when I practice yoga - withdrawing from the senses - balancing poses especially facilitate this for me

Yamas - Is a life practice of not wasting peoples time by being punctual, I don’t steal, I speak my truth, I try hard to not get attached to things or outcomes

Niymamas - I’m studying with IIN to be a health coach, self displine and mindfulness is essential. Mental discomfort of what people think of me is a daily check-in and one i’m constantly working on. I’m all about surrendering to the ethos that everything works out as it meant to, I’ve really learnt to trust the process.



9. Why is being present so important to you? 

I used to be so focused on things in the future, whether it be a day, a week, a month or even a year ahead that I totally missed out on what was happening in the right now.  My whole life is now geared to living in the moment, seeing and surrounding myself with like minded people. Listening and looking people in the eyes, saying hi when normally I would keep my head down, giving a compliment when normally I would think it but not say it - that to me is living in the now.


10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name?

Instagram - debbielashyoga

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/debbie.lash.9

Allowing yourself to learn from both people and experience is a great way to stay humble and leaves room for growth.

IMG-1302.jpeg

Kendra Jean Osborne is a yoga teacher and musician based in Los Angeles.

1. What style of yoga do you teach?

I teach both traditional and contemporary styles of yoga. My first 200hr training was in a traditional based-style, Hot Power Fusion which is similar to Bikrim/26+2. Since my first training I’ve expanded my practice to Vinyasa/Power Yoga now, too.


2. What is your intention behind teaching?

Yoga has always been an outlet for me to explore my inner self and to acknowledge where I can improve in my daily life. When I made the decision to start teaching it was with the intention of bringing a sense of self-understanding and love to those who may need a little extra encouragement, both physically and mentally. Eventually, it grew into a deeply spiritual practice and has fostered some of my strongest relationships. 


3. Who are your mentors in yoga? 

One of my mentors Laura Rebecca is a long time Yogi with many trainings under her belt. What inspired me the most about her practice was the story behind it. After years of practicing martial arts, she developed an injury that forever changed her relationship to her passion and (most importantly) the way she used her body. When I was lucky enough to train under her, she really emphasized the importance of acknowledging that yoga is a great way to rehabilitate the body of injury as well as heal mental and emotional damages from the experience of loss or change. It really opened my eyes to the importance of accessibility and the need to be attentive to the finer details of each student you encounter.


4. What have they taught you? 

Many of my mentors have really helped me gain more confidence in my ability to lead others. I think the biggest lesson I’ve learned is that you can be a student and a teacher at the same time. Allowing yourself to learn from both people and experience is a great way to stay humble and leaves room for growth.


5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you? 

One of my favorite books is “The Science of Self Realization.” It is an interview style read that breaks down the importance of Christ Consciousness in regard to yoga. It puts the teaching of the 8 Limb-Path and Bhagavad Gita in context and in a way that is easy to understand. It has had a huge influence on not just my practice, but my relationship to the creator. 


6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice? 

I’ve been lucky enough to experience pregnancy and childbirth through the lens of yoga. Since giving birth, even being almost a year postpartum, I’ve really had to humble myself to the changes my body is constantly going through. Sometimes we have to go back to square one and re-learn the things that we used to excel at. I’m learning that it’s okay to be tired and frustrated at my body. I’ve learned to approach my practice with more care towards myself and the slower I move the more I learn.


7. How often do you practice

I currently practice every other day at home and about 2-3 times a week in studio. I try to make as much time for my asana practice as possible. I teach 3 times a week in studio and you can find me on the schedule at Hot8Yoga Koreatown.


8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana?

 To maintain a healthy Asana I devote a lot of my time to meditation and prayer. A devotion to a higher power is what drives my asana practice. It is what motivates me to wake up and find a deeper sense of purpose in my day to day life. Without that devotion I find myself stuck in an ego driven cycle that glorifies self rather than the creator which I find can be an unhealthy and sometimes selfish way to live. When we look to something higher we can find a stronger connection the environment around us and a sense of selflessness that in turn provides something of substance to each person you encounter.


9. Why is being present so important to you

Being present is a present. It is a gift that overflows into the hands of everyone around you. When we are present we are committing  ourselves to being attentive to others. It is also a great way to feel more connected to the experience of life. I try my best to stay present through all experiences, good and bad. This helps me learn new ways to cope with compromising situations. Each day I become more present and I am able to cultivate more gratitude for all the lessons I am learning. 


10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name?


You can follow me on Instagram @officialkendrajean

‘Trust the process.’

image1.jpeg

Diana Athena is a yoga teacher based in New York City.

1. What style of yoga do you teach?

I am a certified Vinyasa and Traditional Hot (26+2) Yoga Teacher.


2. What is your intention behind teaching?

My number one intention is to share the gift of yoga, to help people feel good in their body. To share my knowledge and to inspire my students to be their own best teacher.


3. Who are your mentors in yoga?

I have started my yoga journey with Sam Chase and Nikki Carter and am currently studying with Jared McCann.


4. What have they taught you?
It would be hard to describe what they have taught me in just a few sentences. But the most important thing for me was to learn to trust. Trust the process. Trust myself. Trust my universe.


5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you?

“Freedom & Resolve: The Living Edge of Surrender” by Gangaji


6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice?

My body is capable of way more than I ever gave it credit for, and most “STOP” signs are in my head, not my body.


7. How often do you practice?

At least 3 times a week, not counting going upside down whenever I have a break or a few minutes to play :)  


8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana?

Pranayama and meditation are a huge part of my yoga routine, as well as plant-based diet.


9. Why is being present so important to you?

Living in the future creates a lot of fear and anxiety. Living in past is based on attachment. Being present and fully aware is the only way to see the clear picture and to experience things for what they are. None of us truly knows what is going to happen tomorrow, may as well use today’s fullest potential.



10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name?

Follow my journey on Instagram or FB @DianaAthenaYoga.



‘There is always more to learn.’

image2.jpeg

Lara Saget is a yoga teacher based out of New York City.

1. What style of yoga do you teach?

Power vinyasa, traditional hot, restorative, and yin

2. What is your intention behind teaching?

To encourage clarity, mindfulness, and expand awareness

3. Who are your mentors in yoga? 

All of my teachers, including Amy Matthews and Melissa French. 

4. What have they taught you? 

That there is always more to learn.

5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you? 

Yoga Anatomy by Leslie Kaminoff and Amy Matthews 

6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice? 

I am learning that plugging the feet into the ground changes the entire body. 

7. How often do you practice? 

Daily

8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana? 

I am mindful of the way I move through the world and work towards practicing kindness, patience, and gratitude in everything I do. 

9. Why is being present so important to you? 

Each moment is the only moment that we have. 

10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name?

@larasaget 

‘I am learning that movement is medicine.’

FullSizeRender.jpg

Stephanie Acosta is a yoga teacher based in New York City. 

 

1. What style of yoga do you teach?

I teach Vinyasa, Hot Traditional, Buti Yoga, Yin & Kids Yoga


2. What is your intention behind teaching?

 I really just like to get people out of their heads and more into their bodies. Get them to feel more comfortable with themselves.


3. Who are your mentors in yoga?

Alena Wertalik, Phil Lanzetta, Nikki Carter, Jacob Lacopo, Audrey Lane


4. What have they taught you?

Collectively they have taught me so much about myself. I was not comfortable with my body before becoming a yoga teacher but they have taught me compassion. They’ve taught me so much about body awareness and taught me how to love myself. They all saw something in me before I saw it, like they knew something was in me and waiting to come out. It’s so much more than the asana practice because they are incredibly knowledgeable and I have learned so much from them. 


5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you? 

Yoga bug and Good Night Yoga are kids books that I bought for my daughter when she was a year old. I was mesmerized at how much she loved them. She’s 4 years old now and loves Yoga. She has a library full of Yoga books that keep her busy. I love that she’s started yoga at an early age its something I wish i would have had the opportunity to do.


6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice?

I am learning that Movement is Medicine. That moving your body is so powerful. Especially with practicing Buti Yoga, where we are constantly moving and really don’t have time to second guess it. Focusing on what it feels like rather than what it looks like.


7. How often do you practice?

Everyday for the most part, on and off my mat. 


8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana?

I start with being kind with how I talk to myself. Also being mindful of my speech: the opposite of stealing is giving so I try and give as much as I can, whether it be my time, listening with intent and just not expecting something back in return. Treating myself and others with respect & dignity.


9. Why is being present so important to you?

Because it keeps me focused on the now. We can’t do anything about the past but staying present can help me direct the future.


10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name?

You find me on IG: @StephanieAcostaYoga

FB: Stephanie Acosta Yoga

 

‘Through the practice of Yoga on the mat, I have connected and aligned my mind, body and heart to the source.’

FullSizeRender.jpg

Image taken by Matthias Hunkeler  

 

Ryan Nance is a Yoga practitioner based in Los Angeles, California.

 

 1. What was your first yoga experience?

My very first experience of yoga was when I was writing a travel story about a resort in Boca Raton, Florida about 12 or 15 years ago, and it was part of the outline my editor had developed for the story. It was outside, on a deck over the water. I don't remember much about it, but feeling awkward in downward dog.


2. What led to you continuing your practice?

A few years later, during a pretty substantial life change, I found Bikram yoga through a friend in Sarasota Florida and started going more regularly, like 2 times a week. I was playing a lot of pickup soccer at the time and the two exercises supported me well.


3. How long have you been practicing yoga? Asana and the other limbs of yoga.

Until this last year, I really only practiced Asana. I then began first brining pranayama into my practice. I had been a smoker for a long time, until about 10 years ago, and found deep breath a challenge, and I very much needed to work on deepening my breathing so that I could manage my stress levels better.


4. How do you incorporate yoga into your life?

Pranayama led very organically into focused attention, Dharana,  and to meditation, Dhyana. As my practice has intensified I found the Yama and Niyama as resonant as I struggled to understand who I was underneath all the other things, particularly Satya (truthfulness), Saucha (cleanliness), and Samtosa (contentment). Just as I need to be truthful with myself when I am in an asana, so I want to be truthful in my actions and words off the mat.


I practice Asana everyday, even if briefly, like if I am traveling or busy. I begin each practice with a period of breathing and contemplation, sometimes turning into a meditation.


5. What’s the biggest change that you have noticed in your life?

The biggest change that this practice has brought to my life is in bringing coherence to my mind and emotions. While there are very obvious changes in my body, fitness and weight, it is the focused, clear and honest energy that I cultivate that has had the greatest impact and benefit to my wellbeing.


6. How do you make time to practice?

As I started to want to make my practice a more regular part of my life, the first thing I did was wake up an hour earlier so I could always count on getting my morning practice in. For the evening classes, it is a bit more challenging, but between protecting the time from other commitments for an evening class, or carving out time from the end of my work day, I have consistently been able to get to both a morning and evening class, nearly every day, since the beginning of the year.


7. What does yoga mean to you, off of your mat?

Through the practice of Yoga on the mat, I have connected and aligned my mind, body and heart to the source. I had struggled with strong emotions, often at war with one another, for most of my life. And through yoga, I have found that my emotions, and the experience of my mind, is even more vibrant and beautiful when they are coherent, aligned and honest. Off the mat, I have found deep stores of compassion for myself and for others as they struggle with their own misalignment. I have found great internal energy in connecting with other people, now clearly asking only to behold them in their own energy. 


8. Do you see yourself practicing in the next ten or more years?

Very much so. I have been envisioning how I will be able to continue to practice all the way through the ages in front of me. I have shed a lot of the burden I had been accumulating as I got older, and can imagine how with this practice of energy hygiene I can keep myself light and clean, aging gracefully, gratefully and with intent.

‘It’s such a waste to not enjoy what’s happening when it happens!’

Arden Goll is a yoga teacher based out of New York City. 

Arden Goll is a yoga teacher based out of New York City. 

 

1. What style of yoga do you teach?

I teach Vinyasa, heated and non heated, Traditional Hot, Hatha, and Restorative Yoga


2. What is your intention behind teaching?

My intention behind teaching is to help people find something in themselves that makes them FEEL. Feel good, empowered, happy, sad, strong, whatever it may be, because when people leave a class feeling this way they’re just a little more present and in tune with themselves and it’s such a wonderful thing to see your students find that.


3. Who are your mentors in yoga?

Victoria Greene. She is a teacher I work with and just finished leading a TT with.


4. What have they taught you?

So much! Too much to list; Her pranayama and anatomy knowledge is amazing and the way she can guide a class and get me to move my body and really feel it and move in a smart way has really altered my physical practice.


5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you?

Ayurveda (Idiot’s Guide) by Sahara Rose Ketabi. 

This book is great! It makes Ayurveda very easy to understand and apply to your daily life, which in turn has had a great impact on my life but of course my yoga as well.


6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice?

Patience. I like to move fast and hard and flow through things. I act the same in life. I’m working on holding and breathing and being content within the moment. So practicing that on my mat and then trying to apply it to my life is my current learning situation right now. It’s not easy.


7. How often do you practice?

I practice Yoga asana 3-4 times a week in a class setting. At home I keep up daily with a meditation practice. And I’ve recently added dance classes back into my life, which is what drew me to yoga to begin with: my love of movement. 


8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana?

I just try my best to be aware of my actions and my imprint on the outer world I’m leaving behind. Be kind to all, be disciplined with myself, keeping my breath calm to keep me from snapping, observe, and meditate to try to reach peace. I just try my best with bringing the other limbs into my life and let things unfold. Sometimes it works out and well (of course) life happens, sometimes it doesn’t.


9. Why is being present so important to you

I feel like I miss out on so much when I’m not present. It’s something I’ve noticed more as I’m getting older. It’s such a waste to not enjoy what’s happening when it happens! It’s way batter then anything going on with your phone , that’s for sure. I want to enjoy the people and things around me at any given moment and when you’re not present you miss that chance.


10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name?

Instagram: @arden_cicada

FB:   Arden Goll

‘ I strive to always be open and truthful - meaning what I say and saying what I mean.‘

IMG_0020.JPEG

Olivia Dunn is a yoga teacher based out of New York City.  

 

1. What style of yoga do you teach?

I teach mostly power vinyasa, but also slow flow/guided meditation classes. 

 

2. What is your intention behind teaching?

My intention behind teaching is to serve others and spread loving compassion, whether that is as a guide on the yoga path or to just hold space for whatever has brought them to the practice. 

3. Who are your mentors in yoga? At present, I find mentorship in Rose Erin Vaughan and Carlos Vazquez. Both are incredible NYC-based yoga teachers who inspire me and elevate my practice each time I study with them. 

 

4. What have they taught you? Rose Erin has introduced me to the lineage of the Chinese meridian system, and through her incorporation of this knowledge into asana practice, she has given me a new, holistic perspective on my body. Carlos, by leading with the utmost compassion and gentle spirit, has taught me that we practice not only to serve ourselves but to serve and uplift all beings everywhere, with no exceptions. His power yoga classes also put my body into poses I never thought were possible for me, which I find to be a fun aspect of asana practice - facing your fears and surprising yourself with what you’re capable of.

 

5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you?

One Simple Thing: A New Look at the Science of Yoga and How It Can Transform Your Life by Eddie Stern 

 

6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice? 

Recently my awareness has really opened up to the powerful tricks the mind plays to distract away from attempts at pointed concentration. One moment you are locked into experiencing your breath and the next second the mind subtly slips into thinking about a conversation from yesterday or playing a song. I am learning that a tactic to corral the mind is to play its own game. As Patanjali implies in the yoga sutras, you can’t throw away all thought and clear the mind all at once; you must throw the mind little bones, so to speak, slowly training it - using intentional thought, such as mantra - to focus, still, and eventually clear thought, if only for a few seconds. When it wanders, as it will, reign it back in with non-judgment. 

 

7. How often do you practice? Nearly every day. If I am unable to do even a short asana practice, I always prioritize finding a little time in the day to sit with my breath and practice my awareness.

 

8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana? 

I do my best to practice and live by the yamas and niyamas, guidelines for restraints and observances. The most resonant yamas in my life are the practices of truthfulness and nonexcess. I strive to always be open and truthful - meaning what I say and saying what I mean. This is particularly important to me as a teacher. I also value sharing abundance and never taking more than I actually need, restraining from greediness. The most resonant niyamas in my life are the practices of contentment and self-discipline. Contentment has a positive connotation for me - to be content is to rest in the pure peace of your own being, in the abundance of life within you. It is the idea that you already have everything you need; only this form of happiness is sustainable, as it is not based on any external possessions which can come and go, leaving suffering in their wake. This does not mean that you do not engage in the world and strive to achieve goals; it means that you do engage in the world and reach toward goals - but not for yourself, for others. The purpose of everything you do becomes driven by the principle of serving others. How you uniquely can be of service. Self-discipline is also very important to me. Only through self-discipline - staying true to the commitments you make, whatever choices they may be - can you maintain your own peace and live the way that sparks the most joy in your heart, thus sparking joy in all the hearts that you touch. 

 

9. Why is being present so important to you?

As Thich Nhat Hanh says, only this moment is life. 

 

10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name?

My IG handle is olivia_grace_dunn and my FB name is Olivia Dunn.

‘I believe strongly in upholding integrity.’

IMG_6920.JPG

Nia Batiste is a yoga teacher and artist/musician based out of Los Angeles. 

 

 

1. What style of yoga do you teach?

Yin yoga is my preferred style to teach and my voice is closet to Tantra.

2. What is your intention behind teaching?

To remind people to listen to themselves and their bodies, and to notice the urge to react, or resist. Although, I don’t teach as often. I cycled back into student mode. I think that’s important for any yoga teacher, healer, artist, speaker, or service-provider to step back for a moment and receive what they’re giving, because honestly, we forget to do that sometimes. I personally need that break to ground pretty often, but that’s what makes a great teacher, one who is willing to be taught. I come back to my classes with more wisdom and compassion.

3. Who are your mentors in yoga?

I’m currently working with a Reiki Healer, Sosa. She’s called me out on things I’ve never noticed about myself, or didn’t want to notice before; baggage that I’ve carried with me through certain aspects of my life that would have, or have already caused me to react or resist. 


4. What have they taught you?

To notice the root of my actions, reactions and resistances. Is it coming out of fear or out of love? It’s always one or the other, but sometimes the ego gets in the way of seeing things clearly and intuitively, so it’s been nice to work with someone who can translate my energy, bluntly! She’s pretty raw! I’m my best self around people who don’t sugar coat things, and at the same time, can come from a place of love and support. It inspires me to do the same. From that, I’m learning to accept what’s already been done, to notice how I feel about it now, and to transmute my emotions into more love for myself and others by letting it go. For me, my release happens through art. Over time I’ve learned to watch more closely at myself, and anything that may come out of fear, reveals itself as clear as day, through creative expression. Usually at a time when life wants to make a lesson out of me, throwing me on my ass.


5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you?

My Reiki healer actually recommended a book to me called A Return To Love by Marianne Williamson. The title says it all. We hold so much in our mind and body from the past, and we don’t realize how easily things can trigger us back into fear. This book broke me down all the way. Sometimes we have to fall apart into bits and pieces so we can transform into something new, and that’s what’s been happening with me lately.



6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice?

To be slower and allow more. I see the difference in my asana when I’m resisting trust or patience, it becomes upper body focused, strength-focused. That’s why I teach Yin, it reminds me to practice stillness for myself. If I’m going to hold space for others to move slower, then I should hold space for myself too. 

7. How often do you practice?

Everyday, in many ways, not just asana and meditation. Mostly through creative catharsis and healthy living.


8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana?

Good question, I haven’t thought about the 8 limbs since my Yoga School exam. I honestly just Googled what they were to remember... yikes! I’ve spent my entire life learning how to live by this practice, and didn’t even fully realize it, until now. 

 

I practice Dhyana and Dharana through meditation; turning my focus inward so I can connect more deeply with my intuition. There’s usually one thing going on after another with me. I get distracted easily, and although I’ve found ways around that, without grounding myself, things can get out of control. I practice Pranayama by taking breath-work classes, and as far as the Yamas and Niyamas are concerned, I practice them naturally. I believe very strongly in upholding integrity, and self-study is the most Important to me. I have a Psychology background so I can’t help but to look myself in the mirror at the end of the day. Even if someone does wrong by me, I always see the other side to it... eventually. As an empathic person, I can put myself in anyone’s shoes and acknowledge when I’m behaving in a way that goes against pure love, which is ultimately what I believe in and how I choose to live my life. Even if I were to fall out of alignment with that, self-study keeps me in check. I forgive myself and grow from there. It’s all about self-love. If you love yourself enough, applying the 8 limbs feels more instinctual; unfortunately they’re many ways to ignore instincts in this society. Practice is key.

9. Why is being present so important to you?

Because not being present doesn’t work out in my favor, like ever! Not being present looks more like self-sabotage in my world. I’m more at peace when I’m living in the moment. It’s so hard with social media though! You see everyone’s best selves and you can’t help but to think, “what about me?” “I should be…?” “why can’t I…?” or “I wish I could…” The mind battles itself extensively via Social Media. I’ve learned how manage my time around it and how to stay in my own lane.


10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name?

instagram: @niaizb

www.niaimaniziaire.com

‘Let go of a destination.’

IMG_6779.JPG

Carl Danielsen is a yoga teacher based out of New York City. He is the founder of his own style of yoga, Carlyoga. 

 

 1. What style of yoga do you teach? Carlyoga. It’s a blend of many different styles: anusara, ashtanga, katonah, vinyasa and common sense


2. What is your intention behind teaching? To keep people from hurting themselves


3. Who are your mentors in yoga? Ivy Ray, Lindsay Dombrowski


4. What have they taught you? Know the purpose of a pose; describe it simply.


5. Please mention a book that you have read about yoga that has had a positive impact on you? You Are The Placebo, Dr. Joe Dispenza. It’s about meditation. 


6. What lesson are you currently learning in your Asana practice? Let go of destination (what a pose looks like).


7. How often do you practice? 5 times a week


8. How do you implement the other 7 limbs of yoga into your life other than Asana? Philosophy is at the root of all my decisions (ahimsa, asteya, etc.); I meditate frequently.


9. Why is being present so important to you? Time is fleeting (and an illusion). This is the only authentic moment. I want to miss as few of these moments as possible.


10. How can we keep up with you on social media? What is your IG handle and/ FB name? carldanielsen on Instagram and Carl J Danielsen on Facebook